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WOCOBOCO members Veronica Hrutkay and Sharon Simmons are joined by Louisville Colorado Mayor Bob Muckle at the city’s vote to sign on to  Cities for CEDAW .

WOCOBOCO members Veronica Hrutkay and Sharon Simmons are joined by Louisville Colorado Mayor Bob Muckle at the city’s vote to sign on to Cities for CEDAW.

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Local Progress

the following Colorado communities have signed on to the Cities For CEDAW Campaign:

Lafayette: Mayor Christine Berg signed a CEDAW Resolution on October 18, 2016 as part of UN Day of Observance.

Greeley: Mayor Tom Norton signed a Human Rights Proclamation regarding CEDAW in December of 2016 in honor of Human Rights Day

Louisville: Mayor Robert Muckle signed a CEDAW Resolution on June 6, 2017.

Boulder: Mayor Suzanne Jones signed a CEDAW Resolution on October 24, 2017

Boulder County: The Boulder County Commissioners signed a CEDAW Resolution on June 12, 2018

Boulder County Commissioners Cindy Domenico (l) and Deb Gardner (r) at CEDAW signing with Hannah Cope (m).

Boulder County Commissioners Cindy Domenico (l) and Deb Gardner (r) at CEDAW signing with Hannah Cope (m).

The “Bill of Rights for Women”

What is CEDAW?

WoCoBoCo actively supports the Cities for CEDAW Campaign. The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), was adopted in 1979 by the UN General Assembly. It is often described as an international bill of rights for women.  Consisting of a preamble and 30 articles, it defines what constitutes discrimination against women and sets up an agenda for national action to end such discrimination.

The Convention defines discrimination against women as "...any distinction, exclusion or restriction made on the basis of sex which has the effect or purpose of impairing or nullifying the recognition, enjoyment or exercise by women, irrespective of their marital status, on a basis of equality of men and women, of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the political, economic, social, cultural, civil or any other field."

Sharon Simmons, a member of BPW, our Collaborative and the Cities for CEDAW Task force explains, “All but six United Nations countries have signed the CEDAW treaty worldwide. Yes, you guessed it — the U.S. is one that has not. That is why San Francisco started the Cities for CEDAW movement in 1998…nothing (is) prohibiting local or state governments from applying international law to local ordinances.”

Visit the Colorado for CEDAW to learn more.

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By accepting the Convention, cities and states commit themselves to undertake a series of measures to end discrimination against women in all forms, including:

  • incorporating the principle of equality of men and women in their legal system, abolish all discriminatory laws and adopt appropriate ones prohibiting discrimination against women;

  • establishing tribunals and other public institutions to ensure the effective protection of women against discrimination; and

  • ensuring elimination of all acts of discrimination against women by persons, organizations or enterprises.

Be strong, be fearless, be beautiful. And believe that anything is possible when you have the right people there to support you.
— Misty Copeland